Category Archives: Military

Daily “Tot” – Pusser’s Rum (1640-1970)

What’s this all about… a daily “tot” issued to Royal Navy Sailors for more than 330 years?

Treasured Collections is proud to share a story of all things nautical – sailing, yacht racing, RN, traditions, and more! Capturing the story behind a family artifact is fun and yet important to record known information, knowledge and past experience to share with future generations.

British Navy Pusser’s Rum (R) is the Single Malt of Rum that was issued daily on board ships of Great Britain’s Royal Navy for more than 330 years.  From about 1640 until 31 July 1970, a daily rational of rum was issued to sailors on board ship. Known as the “tot” it became the longest unbroken tradition of the history of the sea.

Being from a family with long traditions with the British Royal Navy, I was very aware of “Pusser’s Rum”. Imagine my surprise when in the local LCBO (our Canadian liquor store), I spied this wonderful decanter of Pusser’s Navy Rum!  Evidently with the Admiralty’s blessing this rum became available to the consumer! The Royal Navy Sailor’s Fund, a naval charity, more commonly called the “Tot Fund” benefits from the sales.

This particular ceramic decanter celebrates the magnificent sport of yachting and sailboat racing. The three images include

  1. The Schooner America August 1851 when she won the Hundred Guinea Cup (which later became the America’s Cup),
  2. Jolie Brise, a 56-foot pilot cutter winner of the first Fastnet Race in 1925, Jolie Brise is still sailing today and went on to win the 2000 Tall Ships Race Overall.
  3. A tiny sloop Spray, which wailed around the world single-handed by Captain Joshua Slocum , leaving Boston April 1895, he returned to Rhode Island June 1898.

For me, being from Portsmouth, Hampshire the home of HMS Victory, flagship of Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson…. it was also fun to see the  the slogan “Nelson’s Blood”.

By chance, to add to the fun…. a Portsmouth area chocolate company offer Pusser’s Rum Truffles… neat!

You can see more about Pusser’s Rum and the traditions on their website or just do a Google search!

Personal Heart-Warming Connection: D-Day 75th Anniversary Commemoration

As a lover of history and the daughter, grandaughter, great-grandaughter of a British Royal Naval family raised in the heart of Naval City, Portsmouth, Hampshire, my heart connects with the commemoration of D-Day.

Proudly participating (as a local PR Company in Portsmouth) with the 50th commemoration prior to leaving my home-town area and moving to Canada, I reflect one particular artifact that has brought me joy during my early years in Canada.

Within my personal archives, I have two supplements produced by “The News.” The first outlining the D-Day and Overlord operation, the second a commemorative supplement detailing the events that took place Portsmouth/Southsea in 1994.

When ‘Poppy Day” came around (Remembrance Day – 11 November) I discovered a wonderful connection with the Canadian Servicemen selling poppies at the grocery store, Zerhs, and A & P.

The map featured in supplement laid out where the various battalions were camped-out in readiness for 6 June 1944 – D-Day.

Before leaving I was living in the village of Horndean  just north of Portsmouth – this is where 1st Battalion Queens Own Rifles of Canada and 1st Battalion Canadian Scottish Regiment were posted.  In nearby villages of Emsworth and Wickham were Le Regiment De La Chaudiere and 27th Canadian Armoured Regiment and at the top end of Portsmouth’s island at Hilsea, the Highland Light Infantry of Canada. Just around the harbour at Lee-on-Solent (an area close to where my father was stationed in the Fleet Airarm unit at HMS Daedalus) was another group of Canadians,  the 6th Armoured Regiment.

I hadn’t realized the significance of this wonderful map, which included British, American troops…. until I chatted with an elderly gent in Zerhs, Orangeville, Ontario, selling his poppies. He knew of the various villages very familiar to me – Clanfield, Cowplain and Horndean. We chatted a little…. about the region, and what it was like at that time.

Over the years, via Portsmouth ferries, I’ve taken trips to Normandy, to the beaches, cemeteries and Pegasus Bridge.

Sometimes it is particularly heart-warming to have an exchange with someone who knows where you were, and what you are referring to….. and can connect with your past memories.

Every year since, each November, I’ve made a point to drop by and chat to whoever is on duty selling poppies. Of course as time goes along the service men and women are of a different generation, and don’t have first-hand experience of this event.

We will remember…. Operation Overlord, and all the service men and women who contributed to keeping us free!

Women’s Land Army – Post WWII

Above: Joyce Bake with her gang and two cleaners. Joyce sat on van bonnet  at Brackley Hostel. 1947/48.

This post is created to share photographs belonging to Joyce Bake. They are dated and most identified with the location. Intended to assist with research for family members of those who served with W.L.A. If these images are useful, you are welcome to copy and share.

Joyce Bake (1925-1999) served during WWII with the Women’s Royal Air Force.  Wanting to learn to drive, she worked with the Women’s Land Army (WLA) from 1946-1948. She always recalled this era of her life as the most fun! Hard work and hard-play.

Among her documents are letters addressed from the Agricultural Executive Committee, the County of Northampton, that note that Miss J Bake was employed by the Committee 8 October 1946 until 9 October 1948, in the capacity of Forewoman at the Brackley W.L.A. Hostel.

Artifact: W.L.A. Armband – Joyce Bake.

Above: Joyce and her van. Noted as N.W.A.E.C. at Brackley hostel 1946/47.

Below left: Joyce with head scarf, Brackley, 1948.

Below right: More of the gang, Brackley Hostel.

 

Below: Joyce wearing a suit, front left. No further notes on the photograph.

Below left: Joyce and her best pal Margaret Oakie, at Brackley Hostel. Woman’s Land Army Forewoman 1946-1948.

Below right:  May 1944, Glamorgan. Paddy and friends at family farm. Threshing group.

  

Below left: Joyce’s friends Sheila and Glad at Brackley  1947.

Below right: Joyce Bake in centre, small image, noted as Kislingbury Hostel, N’Hants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ordinary People – Leading the Way!

First Class Shipwright B H Symes, Diver, Seated on Left.

Among some recent military projects, I have seen three examples outstanding bravery and pioneering spirit…. ordinary people – leading the way!

Bertram Henry Symes (1876-1914) joined the British Royal Navy in January 1899. He trained as a shipwright, eventually becoming Chief Shipwright in 1918. What is most remarkable about his career, however, is the fact that he became a Ships Artificer Diver in March 1906. He continued to dive until May 1915, when he was noted as medically unfit to dive, after he got the bends.  Shipwright First Class Symes, was adventurous, although he was not the first to become a ship’s diver, this was certainly early days of deep sea diving, with many unknown factors, and basic equipment.

H.M.S. Ocean leaving Glasgow, 1948.

H.M.S. Ocean was built at the Alexander Stephen and Sons yard on the Clyde, Glasgow, Scotland. The ship was launched in 1944 and commissioned 8 August 1945. Classed as a light fleet carrier was 630 feet long and had a crew of 1,050 sailors and could carry 52 aircraft.

We normally associate naval seamen as ship’s personnel. Peter Colin George (1926-2008) however, joined the British Royal Navy, Fleet Air Arm Division around 1945.  He trained as an aircraft engineer, eventually becoming Chief Petty Officer overseeing engine and aircraft repairs. His training took place at H.M.S. St. James, Douglas, Isle of Man, then at the air craft handling unit R.N.A.S. Worthy Down, also known as H.M.S. Kestrel.

Landing jet planes on a moving ship (later known as an aircraft carrier) was a fairly new concept. He was at the forefront of industry as an aircraft engineer in the Royal Navy.

https://www.thisdayinaviation.com/tag/hms-ocean-r68/ describes the first test flight, take off and landing of a jet-powered aircraft from a ship which carrier took place 3rd December 1945, from HMS Ocean (R68). The aircraft was a de Havilland DH.100 Sea Vampire Mk 10 LZ551/G. An example of this aircraft was held at the Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

Towards the end of his days in the Navy, he worked at the Fleet Air Arm Museum.

Source: Ipswich Star – Button Boy

Finally, not quite so pioneering, but just as brave. One recent project described how a young boy-sailor took up the role of ‘Button Boy’ in the Royal Navy. He was noted as the ‘second’ a stand-in for the lead boy, but he still had to become accomplished and demonstrate his skill for this activity.

Each R.N. training facility sports, a land-based mast, and H.M.S. Ganges is no different. There is a long-standing tradition of young trainees ascending the 143 ft mast, a performance that takes place to music. The ‘button boy’ is the man at the top.  He has to shimmy up the last stretch of the pole, climb over the lightening rod, and sit or stand-to-attention on the round platform at the top.  Ipswich newspaper shares a descriptive story, Height of Dread for Ganges Boys. The trip down from the top is pleasing, tells our client, “you slide the rope from half way, where the others have to step to the beat of the music, all the way to the ground. It’s harder coming down.”

View a Button Boy video one of many to be found on the Internet.

So, all in all, ordinary young men, training for their jobs…. yet leading the way!

I love that my job allows me to delve into different subjects and discover new things. It is heart-warming too, that future generations, friends and family will be able to enjoy a small insight into earlier times!

 

 

Identifying Military Buttons… Fun Research!

British Royal Navy jacket button, rating, circa 1945.

With recent commemoration of WWI – 100 years on!  Remembering family members who were lost and served, for me November 2018 has had a strong military focus!

Working on a few more family artifacts, I dived into the subject of Military Buttons – fascinating!

As always, Google searches can help find lots of useful information. I relied too on help from ex-military colleagues on FaceBook Groups I belong to.

One very useful website for button research was melitomnes.org  A website based in Malta…. but Malta had strong ties with the British Navy.  Over the years my grandfather, uncles and then my father were stationed in Malta. Many of our family members lived in Malta during their assignment, including my grandparents, and one cousin was born there. In 1958 I recall a trip to visit… flying for the first time my mum bundled my brother and I onto a military plane, unfortunately shortly after our arrival, our dad’s ship was called away to some trouble in Aden.

My father held a Malta driving licence. Folded linen card, 2″, 1958.

Back to the buttons…. a wooden trinket/cigarette box holds a number of buttons, among other bits and bobs.

Identifying the backing, the maker, the crowns and other images, allowed me to identify one of my mother’s WAAF button, and my father’s early (pre-officer/rating) button.

Photographed at the top, we can see the edge is plain, without a rope design around the boarder.  This means the button dates before my father (Peter Colin George, Chief Petty Officer, Fleet Air Arm, 1926-2008) took his Petty Officer course in 1950. The crown is the Tudor Crown used from 1902-1953.  The button therefore dates somewhere between his joining date of 1942 and the date he became an officer in 1950.

Identifying the shape of the crown…. helps date RN buttons.

The back of the button has a fixed loop. Again there are various styles of fixing over the years.  The maker’s mark identifies the button was made by Buttons Ltd., Birmingham.

RN Button made by Buttons Ltd, Birmingham, circa 1945.

Our family comes from the naval port of Portsmouth, Hampshire. I was thrilled to discover at sometime earlier there were two button makers in our city.  Gieves also was a company that started in Portsmouth.

To finish up…. I mentioned a trinket box.  That too has a history of its own. I had always thought it was my father’s box, but discover it was more likely it belonged to my mother! The box was made as a fundraiser in aid of Red Cross in 1943.  Made from the mooring mast from the makers of Airships and Blimps at Cardington. My mother was in the Woman’s Air force and Cardington became an Air Force base.  Likely she purchased the box.