Group Support for PastPerfect Users

Join our PastPerfect User Group community!

pastperfectforum

We are a group of Museums, Art Galleries and Historical Societies all using the museum software – PastPerfect.  Most of us are located in Southern Ontario, with some further a field.

For a decade we have met to exchange ideas and experiences using PastPerfect.  The benefits of this exchange are enormous…..

PastPerfect is a comprehensive museum software which comes with a great deal of training opportunities, online, classes (note in Canada), CDs and knowledge-based videos and more.  Building on  this training, our group offers the added benefit of meeting in person to discuss and exchange exchange ideas and experiences with a particular emphasis on the Canadian environment.

New-comers to the group tend ask similar questions. We have started a Technical PastPerfect Forum, so they can search on our previous discussions. All our users can ask questions, get advice and exchange ideas.

If you use PastPerfect – you may join our Forum.  Be sure to identify yourself, your location, and your museum.

Register – Login – Update your Preferences and User Control Panel – Add the group members as your friends….

Whether you join our twice-yearly meetings-in-person or not,  you will be able to connect with other users, get answers to your questions, and search on past minutes. Welcome!

(The Forum is run by Alison Hird, Trainer and Consultant with Treasured Collections.  Any questions drop me an email)

Vintage Bus Ticket Technology Provokes Fond Memories

Intriguing technology from the past – provokes fond memories!

Almex Bus Ticket Dispenser
Almex Bus Ticket Dispenser

As you entered the bus the bus driver would take your fare and print your ticket, as some still do today.  These early ticket dispensing models were mechanical, with dials to print different fares.

I recall however, in earlier times, the driver just drove the bus and there was also a ‘bus conductor’ who rode on the bus with the passengers. He would moved around the bus, upstairs and down, sell and dispense tickets, inspect and clip tickets to show they were used. The bus conductor wore crossed leather straps, with a money bag on one side and a ticket dispenser on the other. He also had a hand-held clipping devise. To us he was fondly known as the “Clipper” or “Clippy”.

Of course staple to my home towns of Portchester and Portsmouth in Hampshire, we had the fun of riding on a double-decker bus. The red buses were Corporation buses, and Green were from a private-run company Southdown Motors.

My first memories of the double-deckers, were “trolley” buses, driven by overhead cables. The trolley buses of which there were 100 or so, ran on nine routes across the City and its outskirts.  Trolley buses ceased operation in July 1963.  The predecessor to the trolley bus was the tram system, run on ground rails. That system closed in 1936.

So, more about the technology of printing bus tickets onto plain paper…. on the go!

The Setright was a mechanical ticket dispenser invented by Australian Henry Roy Setright and patented in 1922, made in the London by Setright Registers Ltd.

Setright Bus Ticket Dispenser, Boxed
Setright Bus Ticket Dispenser, Boxed

The Almex is a Type A. This mechanical ticket machine was created by A B Almex of Sweden, launched in the late 1940s.  These were still in use up to the 1980s.

Almex Bus Ticket Dispenser, Boxed with Blank Paper Ticket Roll
Almex Bus Ticket Dispenser, Boxed with Blank Paper Ticket Roll

These images were shared in a recent post on a group page of history buffs from my home-town!  (Shared here with permission). Seeing the images bought back a swarm of fond memories.

I find it is the quirky, everyday or unusual items that provoke the best stories! Do you agree?