What to avoid using in your antique vase!

When re-arranging some dried flowers, I discovered an issue.  Florist putty used to hold the flower in place had become old and extremely sticky. Once carefully removed (some residue oil still remains), I researched the vase that was once of my Nanna’s favourite.

Constance Spy Mantle Vase Fulham Pottery, London circa 1940
Constance Spy Mantle Vase Fulham Pottery, London circa 1940

Passed to me by my paternal grandmother Irene Evelin (Symes) George (1903-1996) it’s warm cream colour, low profile and elongated shape makes it perfect to create unusual flower arrangements.

Made by The Pottery, Fulham, London, originally founded by John Dwight in 1672. The Pottery, famous for Salt Glazes Stoneware was located at the junction of Kings and Burlington Roads in Fulham in the London Borough of Putney.

A cute paper label with my Grandmother’s handwriting allocated it to me. I have sentimentally left it in place.

Maker's stamp, The Pottery, Fulham, Made in England. FMC.
Maker’s stamp, The Pottery, Fulham, Made in England. FMC.

Research from the stamp and cream coloured glaze leads me to understand that this item is a Constance Spy Art Deco vase designed in the 1930s. Noted as Spry Fulham Pottery Vase (R/0117/ET / LA52215) it was likely made in the 1940s.  The maker’s initials inscribed are FMC.

The frog appears to be the original, the metal is in tact but the centre rubber piece has become hard and brittle.

Flower Frog 1940s

So, although we encourage everyone to use and enjoy their family heirlooms, may I share a little advice of what NOT to use in your special antique vases… avoid florist putty!